ambiant room sound in the drum samples

#1

Hi folks,
first of all, I’m sOOOOO excited that I got my BB yesterday.

I’m sure there will be many more comments forthcoming from this section of the peanut gallery.

Anyway, as I’ve listened to the drums, both now, and before, I’ve been thinking about the room echo.

with headphones on, it sounds like these drums were recorded in a GREAT live room, but when those drums are played back on a speaker in a different setting, all of a sudden they sound like they’re in a box coming out of a speaker, and their ambient sound doesn’t match that of the other instruments coming out of the speaker.

I rarely use any reverb because I much prefer for my sound to reverberate through the space where I’m playing.

So, I would love to have these same drum sets, but mixed so that we don’t hear so much of the room or ambient reverberation in the samples. It would be great to hear just the close mics and let the user add the echo or reverb if they want it, or not.

I’m thinking of trying to compress some of it out myself. We’ll see what that sounds like.
rusty

#2

The issue you are describing is directly related to the specs of the device which is playing the sound from BeatBuddy.

Please refer to the user manual. As far as I recall it, there was a great section about what you are speaking. It boils down to a guitar amp being very selective in the set of frequencies that are played. Thus the difference in sound between headphones (that’s exactly how it intended to be played) and your amp. If you plug BeatBuddy into a high quality stereo system, you will get probably even better sound than in your headphones.

#3

Hi Daefecator,
I understand what you’re saying about the difference between hearing the BB through a guitar amp and higher fidelity speakers. but that’s not what I’m talking about. When you listen to the BB on headphones, or nice speakers, you not only hear the drum set, but you hear the room it is in. The drums echo in that room, and there were almost certainly a few microphones placed specifically to pick up that “room” sound. but I would prefer NOT to hear that room echo. I would prefer just to have the sound of the closely miked drum only.

the reason for this is that when you play the BB through a high quality PA or set of speakers in a live situation, some people, including me, don’t want to hear that recorded room echo. Subconsciously, it remind the listener that they are lisening to a recording.

Taking out the “roominess” would make the BB drums sound that much more present in the space where I am playing.

I’ve found some drum samples I am thinking of buying which offer the use of just the close mics so I’m probably going to give those a try.

rusty

#4

Oh, RustyP, I am sorry I didn’t get it quite right from the first time :slight_smile:

If you are having the opposite problem - to remove the ambient room sound from the samples - the best way would probably be to use other samples. Exactly as you said, you are likely to get better results with getting that close-miked drum samples from elsewhere.

Yet, I don’t have that subconscious feeling as if I am listening to a recording you are talking about no matter I am using my PA, headphones or a stereo system.